Quackcast 239 - Draw your world, community edition

Oct 5, 2015

Last week Tantz Aerine and Pitface told us about how they came up with a visual look for their comic worlds. THIS week members of the community weigh in and give us THEIR perspective on their perspective… views of their comic environments. We have very interesting views from al of them! Oh, I apologise for the saucy repartee between Banes and I at the start of the Quackcast. We're very bad people. Gunwallace's theme this week was for Trevor Mueller's Award Winning Albert The Alien! With lyrics by Gunwallace and spoken by an Alien, not Albert.

Episode 238 - Draw your world

Sep 28, 2015

4 likes, 3 comments

We had a Quackcast about creating your world a while ago, but that was mainly in terms of writing. Some people touched on the visual aspects, Falopian Crusader among them, and Usedbooks showed us her city map. For this Quackcast we discussed creating the LOOK of the world your story takes place in. Whether that's just the flat scenes with a few props you get in a comic strip or the whole city you get in Tantz Aerine's Without Moonlight. Do you do research? Just base it all on imagination? Draw what you know? Do you do designs for buildings, floor plans, interiors, the objects within the room? What about the colour choices of your environments - Do you go for a unified scheme or just do whatever? Pitface and Tantz Aerine joined us to tell us how THEY do it. Have a listen to Gunwallace's quirky theme for the slice of life comic Monday Monday!

Episode 233 - Formulas Forever!

Aug 24, 2015

5 likes, 5 comments

Here we go again, back to formulas! This time we got some external input. Fellow DDers had a say about their idea about the utility of formulas and how they use them in their writing and comics. It's important to understand formulas in writing so you know what works and why it works, it can help you in your own work. And when you need to and you've got the ability you can create your OWN writing formula. But remember: the formula is just the bare skeleton, you have to add all the meat and flesh to it with the rest of your writing, don't let the bones show through! Listen to Gunwallace's beautiful theme for Brave New World! Oh, and one last thing… HAPPY BIRTHDAY TANTZ AERINE!!!!

Episode 232 - Creating a Rounded World

Aug 17, 2015

5 likes, 8 comments

Hello, hello, hello! This is the second part of our hugely long expose on the tricky art of WORLD BUILDING! And it really IS extra loooooooooooog… that's because we take so much time crafting the Quackcast world for you. To recap: world-building is a big part of ALL fiction from SciFi and fantasy to your common or garden police shows or even comic strips. You create locations that have relationships with each other, characters that have jobs, families, friends, histories etc, all that is just as much world building as a fantasy world with a specific style of magic and monsters or a SciFi world with aliens and a 1000 year war. Typically, if you do your homework and set up your world nicely then it makes it easier to write stories within it, but you also have to remember not to show all that research to people in the form of big long explanations. Banes and Bravo1102 join Ozoneocean to talk about it! Listen to Gunwallace's lovely theme for Regarding Dandelions!

Episode 231 - The importance of world building

Aug 9, 2015

8 likes, 6 comments

You always do a bit of world building in fiction, in some types of stories like alternative histories, fantasy and Sci-Fi you have to do a bit more, in things set in the real world you don't have to do nearly as much - maybe only limited to a few rooms, character occupations and relationships etc, rather than planets and political systems, but the point is you're always doing it. There are good ways to do world building and bad ways i.e. work out as many details as you need to but have that all behind the scenes, not introduced as a wall of text or long explanations on how things work. World building should inform you story and make it work seamlessly, not prop it up like a rickety scaffold. The topic of the importance of World Building was previously touched on a few years ago by Skoolmunkee and Kroatz for Quackcast 39, but things happened at that recording was lost to history, so now we approach it again with all new contributions, strident opinions, and points of view on the subject. Gunwallace did a cool theme for Red Velvet Requiem!

Episode 224 - Finding your own voice as a writer

Jun 22, 2015

4 likes, 6 comments

For Quackcast 224 I've asked Kevin Hayman back again (KOTA's world, Mailbox Rocketship, Erant Apprentice), to regale us with his Owen Wilson stylings... But seriously, the topic is "finding your own voice in writing", i.e. learning not to imitate your hero's, move beyond that and write in your own style. Kevin is a really funny and interesting guy who's been doing webcomics for many many years since the very earliest days of Drunk Duck and he has some great insights to impart on "finding your own voice". You can also catch KOTA at the Mississippi comic con this weekend! -Enjoy Gunwallace's lovely, creepy musical take on our featured comic, Restless.

Episode 214 - Good character, Bad character? Part 2

Apr 12, 2015

4 likes, 5 comments

Continuing our theme from last week, Bravo1102 joins us to discuss good and bad character creation, along with two very well written characters; PitFace and Tantz Aerine! We use our best silly voices to read out the words of the smart people who had something to say on the subject in question and then we all get together to pick apart and discuss the points they made. Bravo joins us for the first time as a participant and not an interviewee and showcases his excellent and versatile vocal talents! Also- Gunwallace's tune for Joy To The World is especially funky. Please enjoy Quackcast 214!

Episode 211 - How Mary Sure Are You?

Mar 23, 2015

6 likes, 13 comments

Hello hello hello! This week Ozoneocean and Banes pirate another of HippieVan's much discussed newsposts. When the test for Mary Sue was brought up in our recent writing tests Quackcast it generated some heated talk so HippieVan went a little deeper into it and people responded again. Banes and I discuss those responses and try to come up with some sort of consensus on how to more properly use the Mary Sue test and some of its pitfalls: i.e. it's highly context sensitive and can't be used easily on certain genres (Superhero etc), it's also something you as a writer typically don't have to worry about unless you're inexperienced- or so Banes and I believe.


Forgot Password
©2011 WOWIO, Inc. All Rights Reserved Google+